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 Lars Sanders, Timber Faller, Hathaway Pines, CA, 1988   Sap In Their Veins   On my last day working in the woods, my rigging crew and I shared beers and farewells at the local bar. Jack Hannah, our siderod, said, “When you’re done with photography school, I hope you don’t forget us dirty old loggers.”  Ten years later at the height of the Pacific Northwest battle between the logging industry and the environmental movement, I worked with the Mendocino County Museum to create a portrait exhibit of loggers. Along with the portraits were excerpts from the oral histories I recorded. The exhibit traveled to four museums. The last was the World Forestry Center in Portland, Oregon.       Here is one story from Lars Sanders, Hathaway Pines, California 1987   “I remember when I first went to work in the woods with my dad. It was early spring during The Depression, and I was chopping limbs off the trees my dad fell. The axe glanced off a limb and cut my leg. Dad was real calm, you know, and he packed it with snow and went back to work.    Once it was real cold he came back and took a needle and thread out of his pocket. While he sewed me up he said, ‘Son, you got the sap of these trees in your veins now, you’ll be in the woods the rest of your life’.    Years later when my middle son Ross first went to work with me in the woods, the chainsaw bucked back and cut his knee pretty good. On the way to the hospital I told him, ‘Son you got the sap of these trees runnin’ through your veins now, you’ll be in the woods the rest of your life.” 

Lars Sanders, Timber Faller, Hathaway Pines, CA, 1988

Sap In Their Veins

On my last day working in the woods, my rigging crew and I shared beers and farewells at the local bar. Jack Hannah, our siderod, said, “When you’re done with photography school, I hope you don’t forget us dirty old loggers.”

Ten years later at the height of the Pacific Northwest battle between the logging industry and the environmental movement, I worked with the Mendocino County Museum to create a portrait exhibit of loggers. Along with the portraits were excerpts from the oral histories I recorded. The exhibit traveled to four museums. The last was the World Forestry Center in Portland, Oregon.  

 

Here is one story from Lars Sanders, Hathaway Pines, California 1987

“I remember when I first went to work in the woods with my dad. It was early spring during The Depression, and I was chopping limbs off the trees my dad fell. The axe glanced off a limb and cut my leg. Dad was real calm, you know, and he packed it with snow and went back to work.

Once it was real cold he came back and took a needle and thread out of his pocket. While he sewed me up he said, ‘Son, you got the sap of these trees in your veins now, you’ll be in the woods the rest of your life’.

Years later when my middle son Ross first went to work with me in the woods, the chainsaw bucked back and cut his knee pretty good. On the way to the hospital I told him, ‘Son you got the sap of these trees runnin’ through your veins now, you’ll be in the woods the rest of your life.” 

 Ross Sanders, Timber Faller 1987

Ross Sanders, Timber Faller 1987

 Jim Nelson, Faller 1987

Jim Nelson, Faller 1987

 Larry F. Caswell, Timber Faller 1987

Larry F. Caswell, Timber Faller 1987

 Harry Brundage, Choker Setter 1988

Harry Brundage, Choker Setter 1988

 Dan Wizner, Catskinner 1987

Dan Wizner, Catskinner 1987

 Manny, Knot Bumper 1977

Manny, Knot Bumper 1977

 Donald Bruce Cash, Knot Bumper 2004

Donald Bruce Cash, Knot Bumper 2004

 Ron Rector, Loader Operator 2004

Ron Rector, Loader Operator 2004

 James Lee Wilson Skidder Operator, 2004

James Lee Wilson Skidder Operator, 2004

 Lee Wilson, Catskinner 2004

Lee Wilson, Catskinner 2004

 Andres Cuevas, Hook Tender 2004

Andres Cuevas, Hook Tender 2004

 Ben Cringle, Equipment Operator 2004

Ben Cringle, Equipment Operator 2004

 Robert Ambrosini, Loader Operator 2004

Robert Ambrosini, Loader Operator 2004

 Rick Martin, Equipment Operator 2004

Rick Martin, Equipment Operator 2004

 Don Rector, Filling Truck with Chips for the CoGen Plant 2004

Don Rector, Filling Truck with Chips for the CoGen Plant 2004

 Hauling Slash to the Chipper, 2004

Hauling Slash to the Chipper, 2004

 Jake Gregg, Timber Faller 1987

Jake Gregg, Timber Faller 1987

 Jim Nelson, Faller 1987

Jim Nelson, Faller 1987

 Pat Prest, Siderod, 2004

Pat Prest, Siderod, 2004

 Calked Boot and Bumper, 1988

Calked Boot and Bumper, 1988

Lars Sanders, Timber Faller, Hathaway Pines, CA, 1988

Sap In Their Veins

On my last day working in the woods, my rigging crew and I shared beers and farewells at the local bar. Jack Hannah, our siderod, said, “When you’re done with photography school, I hope you don’t forget us dirty old loggers.”

Ten years later at the height of the Pacific Northwest battle between the logging industry and the environmental movement, I worked with the Mendocino County Museum to create a portrait exhibit of loggers. Along with the portraits were excerpts from the oral histories I recorded. The exhibit traveled to four museums. The last was the World Forestry Center in Portland, Oregon.  

 

Here is one story from Lars Sanders, Hathaway Pines, California 1987

“I remember when I first went to work in the woods with my dad. It was early spring during The Depression, and I was chopping limbs off the trees my dad fell. The axe glanced off a limb and cut my leg. Dad was real calm, you know, and he packed it with snow and went back to work.

Once it was real cold he came back and took a needle and thread out of his pocket. While he sewed me up he said, ‘Son, you got the sap of these trees in your veins now, you’ll be in the woods the rest of your life’.

Years later when my middle son Ross first went to work with me in the woods, the chainsaw bucked back and cut his knee pretty good. On the way to the hospital I told him, ‘Son you got the sap of these trees runnin’ through your veins now, you’ll be in the woods the rest of your life.” 

Ross Sanders, Timber Faller 1987

Jim Nelson, Faller 1987

Larry F. Caswell, Timber Faller 1987

Harry Brundage, Choker Setter 1988

Dan Wizner, Catskinner 1987

Manny, Knot Bumper 1977

Donald Bruce Cash, Knot Bumper 2004

Ron Rector, Loader Operator 2004

James Lee Wilson Skidder Operator, 2004

Lee Wilson, Catskinner 2004

Andres Cuevas, Hook Tender 2004

Ben Cringle, Equipment Operator 2004

Robert Ambrosini, Loader Operator 2004

Rick Martin, Equipment Operator 2004

Don Rector, Filling Truck with Chips for the CoGen Plant 2004

Hauling Slash to the Chipper, 2004

Jake Gregg, Timber Faller 1987

Jim Nelson, Faller 1987

Pat Prest, Siderod, 2004

Calked Boot and Bumper, 1988

 Lars Sanders, Timber Faller, Hathaway Pines, CA, 1988   Sap In Their Veins   On my last day working in the woods, my rigging crew and I shared beers and farewells at the local bar. Jack Hannah, our siderod, said, “When you’re done with photography school, I hope you don’t forget us dirty old loggers.”  Ten years later at the height of the Pacific Northwest battle between the logging industry and the environmental movement, I worked with the Mendocino County Museum to create a portrait exhibit of loggers. Along with the portraits were excerpts from the oral histories I recorded. The exhibit traveled to four museums. The last was the World Forestry Center in Portland, Oregon.       Here is one story from Lars Sanders, Hathaway Pines, California 1987   “I remember when I first went to work in the woods with my dad. It was early spring during The Depression, and I was chopping limbs off the trees my dad fell. The axe glanced off a limb and cut my leg. Dad was real calm, you know, and he packed it with snow and went back to work.    Once it was real cold he came back and took a needle and thread out of his pocket. While he sewed me up he said, ‘Son, you got the sap of these trees in your veins now, you’ll be in the woods the rest of your life’.    Years later when my middle son Ross first went to work with me in the woods, the chainsaw bucked back and cut his knee pretty good. On the way to the hospital I told him, ‘Son you got the sap of these trees runnin’ through your veins now, you’ll be in the woods the rest of your life.” 
 Ross Sanders, Timber Faller 1987
 Jim Nelson, Faller 1987
 Larry F. Caswell, Timber Faller 1987
 Harry Brundage, Choker Setter 1988
 Dan Wizner, Catskinner 1987
 Manny, Knot Bumper 1977
 Donald Bruce Cash, Knot Bumper 2004
 Ron Rector, Loader Operator 2004
 James Lee Wilson Skidder Operator, 2004
 Lee Wilson, Catskinner 2004
 Andres Cuevas, Hook Tender 2004
 Ben Cringle, Equipment Operator 2004
 Robert Ambrosini, Loader Operator 2004
 Rick Martin, Equipment Operator 2004
 Don Rector, Filling Truck with Chips for the CoGen Plant 2004
 Hauling Slash to the Chipper, 2004
 Jake Gregg, Timber Faller 1987
 Jim Nelson, Faller 1987
 Pat Prest, Siderod, 2004
 Calked Boot and Bumper, 1988